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Marshawn Lynch doc among IDFA 2019 selections

The International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) has unveiled the first film selections for its 2019 edition. The slate includes 54 titles from across the new ‘focus’ programs “It Still Hurts”, ...
October 1, 2019

The International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) has unveiled the first film selections for its 2019 edition.

The slate includes 54 titles from across the new ‘focus’ programs “It Still Hurts”, “Re-releasing History” and “The Villain,” as well as the retrospective of guest of honor Patricio Guzmán and a special tribute section to D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus.

The “It Still Hurts” program will explore the post-World War II reality and how contemporary life continues to be shaped by the war’s legacy. Films include the Dutch premieres of Thomas Heise’s Heimat Is a Space in Time, Réka Szabó′s The Euphoria of Being, Jonathan Littel’s Wrong Elements and Ehab Tarabieh’s Of Land and Bread.

“Re-releasing History” features films comprised entirely of pre-existing footage, such as archival material, home movies, and found footage. These include the European premiere of David Shields’ Marshawn Lynch: A History (pictured) and the Dutch premiere of Sergei Loznitsa’s State Funeral, appearing alongside new works from Andrei Ujica, Peter Forgacs, Maciej Drygas and Alina Marazzi.

Meanwhile, “The Villain” program includes films that explore the figure of the criminal and our cultural fascination with criminal infamy. Titles include the Dutch premiere of The Brink by Alison Klayman, as well as modern classics in El Sicario Room 164 (Gianfranco Rosi, 2010), The Look of Silence (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2014), General Idi Amin: A Self Portrait (Barbet Schroeder, 1974) and A Moment of Innocence (Mohsen Makhbalhaf, 1996).

Elsewhere, the festival will welcome guest of honor Chilean documentary filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who will present 10 films that shaped him as a filmmaker — including Mother Dao, the Turtlelike (Vincent Monnikendam, 1995), La jetée (Chris Marker, 1962) and The Sugar Curtain (Camila Guzmán Urzúa, 2006) — alongside a selection of seven films from his filmography: the seminal trilogy The Battle of Chile (1975-1979), Obstinate Memory (1997) and his latest trilogy which culminates in The Cordillera of Dreams (2019).

Finally, the fest will present an honorary program paying tribute to filmmaking legends D.A. Pennebaker, who died earlier this year, and Chris Hegedus, whose partnership helped define documentary film as we know it today. Films presented in the tribute are Daybreak Express (1953), Don’t Look Back (1967), Town Bloody Hall (1979) and The War Room (1993).

The 32nd annual IDFA takes place Nov. 20 to Dec. 1.

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