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Wildfilmhistory debuts

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first edited wildlife film In Birdland, and to celebrate this landmark, Wildscreen is launching a project that will make such film history available to the masses. Wildfilmhistory gathers all the important films and TV in the wildlife genre, as well as books and interviews, into a physical and online library open to the public. 'If you look at what's happened between 1907 and 2007,' says Richard Edwards, the project supervisor, 'what an incredible journey we've been on. We've gone from a few short minutes of black and white footage added together to the fabulous cinematography in Planet Earth.'
October 1, 2007

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first edited wildlife film In Birdland, and to celebrate this landmark, Wildscreen is launching a project that will make such film history available to the masses. Wildfilmhistory gathers all the important films and TV in the wildlife genre, as well as books and interviews, into a physical and online library open to the public. ‘If you look at what’s happened between 1907 and 2007,’ says Richard Edwards, the project supervisor, ‘what an incredible journey we’ve been on. We’ve gone from a few short minutes of black and white footage added together to the fabulous cinematography in Planet Earth.’

Both the website and Bristol-based library are hoping to be available in November to track the journey with landmark films and television from the genre, as well as interviews with some pioneering wildlife filmmakers, like Sir David Attenborough, Christopher Parsons and Alan Root. The physical library will offer more than the hard copies of films, with books, equipment and a research room available at the Wildscreen offices. A database will be available on the Web version, with clips and synopses of digitized films, as well as production info. It will also be a window to the physical library, with a full list and page scans from the books in Bristol.

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

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