TV

ohm:tv developing webisodes for Six Degrees of Separation format

While many of us in North America are familiar with the 'six degrees of separation' theory via a game involving actor Kevin Bacon (oddly enough), the theory actually originated in 1929 via a short story from Hungarian writer Frigyes Karinthy. Now, format sales/distribution company ohm:tv is releasing a seven-minute web version of the format Six Degrees of Separation, in conjunction with Samsung and real-time people search tool 123people.com. The format challenges participants to reach a given target person by less than six handshakes in a limited period (from one day to one week), even if the target is in another country or continent. The web project will be launched in nine markets, the first being Austria, where the half-hour reality format was originally produced by ER Media.
November 18, 2009

While many of us in North America are familiar with the ‘six degrees of separation’ theory via a game involving actor Kevin Bacon (oddly enough), the theory actually originated in 1929 via a short story from Hungarian writer Frigyes Karinthy. Now, format sales/distribution company ohm:tv is releasing a seven-minute web version of the format Six Degrees of Separation, in conjunction with Samsung and real-time people search tool 123people.com. The format challenges participants to reach a given target person by less than six handshakes in a limited period (from one day to one week), even if the target is in another country or continent. The web project will be launched in nine markets, the first being Austria, where the half-hour reality format was originally produced by ER Media.

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

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