TV

History UK gets into the “Grave Trade”

History in the UK is set to explore death and burial through the lens of a family-run business in Grave Trade from ITV Studios.
February 2, 2012


History in the UK is set to explore death and burial through the lens of a family-run business in Grave Trade from ITV Studios.

History, the joint venture between A+E Networks and BSkyB, has commissioned the six-part, one-hour episode series which is currently in production and scheduled to broadcast in the fall.

Grave Trade focuses on T Cribbs & Sons, one of the UK’s longest running funeral businesses. The series follows the inner workings of the family-run business as well as a team of archaeologists as they excavate bodies from Roman, Saxon, medieval and post-medieval sites from across the country. Each episode will have a theme that ties together the contemporary funeral directors and the archaeologists at work.

“We’re very excited about this commission as ITV Studios have found a really original way to tackle this sensitive subject matter, one that is rarely seen on television,” said Rachel Job, head of acquisitions and commissioning, History and Military History at A+E Networks UK. “Death is a hugely important and ritualistic part of any society and the archaeologists’ discoveries, contrasting with the busy contemporary funeral trade, will capture a revealing insight into how our perceptions of death have changed throughout history.”

 

About The Author
Justin Anderson joined Realscreen as senior staff writer in 2021, reporting and writing stories for the newsletter and magazine. During his 20-year career he’s filled a variety of roles as a writer and editor at a number of media organizations, covering news and current affairs as well as business, tech, the film and music industries and plenty in between. He’s also spent time behind the scenes in television production, having written everything from voiceover scripts for documentaries to marketing copy. He has a degree in Journalism from Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University).

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