Docs

Magnolia Pictures acquires Rodney Ascher’s “A Glitch in the Matrix”

Indie distributor Magnolia Pictures has acquired the worldwide rights to acclaimed filmmaker Rodney Ascher’s feature-length sci-fi documentary, A Glitch in the Matrix. The 90-minute film, which will premiere at the 2021 Sundance ...
December 17, 2020

Indie distributor Magnolia Pictures has acquired the worldwide rights to acclaimed filmmaker Rodney Ascher’s feature-length sci-fi documentary, A Glitch in the Matrix.

The 90-minute film, which will premiere at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival as part of the Midnight Section, utilizes a noted speech from science fiction writer Philip K. Dick (A Scanner DarklyThe Man in the High Castle) to explore the conspiracy theory that humanity is living in a simulation.

Leaving no stone unturned, the film uses such contemporary cultural touchstones as Lana and Lilly Wachowski’s The Matrix, interviews with real people shrouded in digital avatars, and a wide array of voices, expert and amateur alike, in an attempt to figure out if the simulation theory is not science fiction but fact.

Magnolia will release the film in theaters and on demand from Feb. 5.

A Glitch in the Matrix is produced by Ross M. Dinerstein’s Campfire, part of the Wheelhouse Group, in association with Highland Park Classics and Valparaiso Pictures.

Executive producers are Ascher, Colin Frederick, Ross Girard, David Carrico and Adam Paulsen. Co-executive producers are Tim Kirk, Rebecca Evans, Neil Tabatznik, and Robin Smith. Dinerstein serves a producer on the film. Tyler Glodt co-produces.

The deal was negotiated by Magnolia’s EVP Dori Begley and John Von Thaden, SVP of acquisitions; and by CAA Media Finance on behalf of the filmmakers.

Ascher is represented by CAA, manager Lee Stobby and lawyer Stephen Clark.

A Glitch in the Matrix is a mind-scrambler in the most profound, accomplished way,” said Magnolia president Eamonn Bowles in a statement. “Rodney Ascher has made a work that will have you legitimately questioning your universe.”

“The film was an amazing opportunity to engage with big ideas and explore animation and science-fiction inspired imagery on the biggest canvas I’ve ever had, so I’m thankful we’re in such good hands to get it out into the world,” added Ascher.

About The Author
Jillian Morgan is the Associate Editor at Realscreen with a background in journalism and digital marketing. She joined the publication in 2019 after serving as the assistant editor to trade publications HPAC and On-Site. With a bachelor of journalism from the University of King's College in Halifax, she also works as a freelance writer and fact-checker.

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