People/Biz

Sundance Institute unveils two new funds for BIPOC artists, organizations

The Sundance Institute has created two new granting funds intended for Black and Indigenous artists and artists of color. Launching today through an open application, the Uprise Grant Fund will dedicate ...
March 10, 2021

The Sundance Institute has created two new granting funds intended for Black and Indigenous artists and artists of color.

Launching today through an open application, the Uprise Grant Fund will dedicate US$100,000 to support up to 25 emerging U.S.-based BIPOC artists whose development has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Arts Organizations Grant, meanwhile, will see $100,000 granted to eight to 10 U.S.-based BIPOC-led arts organizations working in film, theater, and emerging media.

The fund is a continuation of the organizational granting the Institute began last year as part of its Respond and Reimagine Plan, which dedicated $1 million in grants to artists and organizations impacted by the pandemic, with priority support for BIPOC artists and organizations that have been disproportionately affected.

Applications will launch in the spring with nominators from a broad cross-section of media, arts, racial justice, philanthropy and impact fields.

The news was announced by Michelle Satter, founding director, Feature Film Program; Carrie Lozano, director, Documentary Film Program and Fund; Bird Runningwater, director, Indigenous Program and Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; and Karim Ahmad, director, Outreach and Inclusion.

“Submissions to the Sundance Institute’s labs and granting programs have been steady — in some cases higher than ever — and we recognize the ongoing urgency of providing creative and financial support to artists making new work during a time of great difficulty. With this in mind, in addition to our existing creative labs, grants, and fellowships, we have expanded and enriched our direct financial support for artists this year with a particular focus on BIPOC communities,” Satter, Lozano, Runningwater and Ahmad jointly stated in a release.

“These funds intend to address the deeply disproportionate effects the pandemic and racial terror have had on artists of color. With Uprise, our goal is to provide unrestricted financial support to those artists at key moments in their career development with the sole aim of combating the erasure of these important voices from our culture and society,”¬†Ahmad added.

About The Author
Jillian Morgan is the Associate Editor at Realscreen with a background in journalism and digital marketing. She joined the publication in 2019 after serving as the assistant editor to trade publications HPAC and On-Site. With a bachelor of journalism from the University of King's College in Halifax, she also works as a freelance writer and fact-checker.

Menu

Search