News

SQUAWK box: Social networking

The buzz surrounding broadband and social networking sites at MIPCOM didn't quiet down after the market. At November's Promax UK Conference, Dawn Airey, managing director of global content at UK broadcaster ITV, ran with the theme, adding her own spirited input. While she acknowledged the profound impact broadband is having on traditional media consumption, she also made comments like 'Television remains at the heart of any entertainment business and will for many years to come,' and 'A website like YouTube or Facebook doesn't create content. It doesn't control distribution. And it's not in the business of marketing anything either.' Airey furthered that the entertainment industry has to use these sites, not be used by them.
December 1, 2007

The buzz surrounding broadband and social networking sites at MIPCOM didn’t quiet down after the market. At November’s Promax UK Conference, Dawn Airey, managing director of global content at UK broadcaster ITV, ran with the theme, adding her own spirited input. While she acknowledged the profound impact broadband is having on traditional media consumption, she also made comments like ‘Television remains at the heart of any entertainment business and will for many years to come,’ and ‘A website like YouTube or Facebook doesn’t create content. It doesn’t control distribution. And it’s not in the business of marketing anything either.’ Airey furthered that the entertainment industry has to use these sites, not be used by them.

Since Bruce David Klein’s New York-based prodco, Atlas Media, recently started a digital and emerging media group, realscreen asked him to chime in on this topic: ‘Facebook and MySpace are cool tools, but not transformative entertainment experiences. They are more like mini-entertainment experiences. For now, and for the foreseeable future, broadcast and cable programming delivered to a TV at home will absolutely be the critical mass of the TV business. Still, the creative opportunities in creating these mini-experiences for mobile devices and the Internet are staggering. We have seen a tenfold increase in revenue from our digital division this year – so we have been careful to build new media into our plans in a big way. Traditional TV will be king for a long while, but there will be a lot of cool princes making a lot of noise on other platforms.’

Ira Bernstein, co-president of New York-based Debmar-Mercury, is keeping his sights firmly set on traditional TV. ‘Right now TV still commands 90-plus percent of the audience and probably an even greater percentage of ad revenue,’ he says, ‘which is why it remains the focus of our attention.’

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

Menu

Search