Screening Room

Mip TV Picks 2008: Celebrity Rehab

For many, prying into the dirty double lives of celebrities is a guilty pleasure - though with entire industries dedicated to facilitating it, it's not hard for voyeurs to find fodder for their fantasies. But Celebrity Rehab is different.
April 1, 2008


For many, prying into the dirty double lives of celebrities is a guilty pleasure – though with entire industries dedicated to facilitating it, it’s not hard for voyeurs to find fodder for their fantasies. But Celebrity Rehab is different. In the same way GRB’s Intervention put a personal face on mainstream substance abuse, Celebrity Rehab gets behind the tabloid trash talk to show real people facing their demons.

The series centers around the work of Dr. Drew Pinsky, a world-renowned addiction specialist and consultant to the stars. Pinsky has opened his Southern Californian facility to cameras in order for the producers to film a group of eight celebrities as they try to find some semblance of normalcy in what have been very abnormal lives. Though few find sympathy for the stars they love to hate, this series demonstrates the other side of renown, when being famous slips into infamy.

Rehab is a surprise hit for VH1, with ratings above average for almost all demos. The first four episodes of the series have beaten the Q1 primetime average for A18-49 by 118%, and have even attracted an older audience (by four years) than VH1′s norm. Partners: John Irwin Productions (LA) for MTV Networks, distributed through RDF Rights (London)
Aired: VH1
Length: 9 x 60 minutes, 90-minute reunion special
Rights available: All worldwide, excluding US (VH1 channel affiliates have right of first refusal); format available worldwide, excluding the US

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

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