TV

Canwest announces lifestyle slate for winter 2010

Bitchin' Kitchen, House of Bryan and Love Incorporated are among the titles Canwest will be rolling out across its three specialty lifestyle channels this winter and into 2010.
August 19, 2009

Bitchin’ Kitchen, House of Bryan and Love Incorporated are among the titles that Canadian media company Canwest will be rolling out across its three specialty lifestyle channels this winter and into 2010.

Food Network will be premiering the irreverent Bitchin’ Kitchen (6 X 30 minutes). The series, produced by Tricon Films and Television and hosted by chef-comedienne Nadia G, already boasts a dedicated following through its online series and cookbook. Also currently in production are Fearless Chef (w/t), produced by Red Apple and featuring the exploits of chef Lynn Crawford as she travels high and low in search of the freshest ingredients, and Chef Off (w/t), a culinary challenge show produced by Planetworks and hosted by Kevin Brauch (Thirsty Traveler, Iron Chef America). Returning series include The Heat, Glutton for Punishment and Wild Chef.

HGTV will carry the world broadcast premiere of House of Bryan (13 x 30 minutes, produced by Sharper Image Film and Video Productions Inc.). The show features contractor Bryan Baeumler (Disaster DIY, pictured), who will be attempting to build the ‘house of his dreams’ for himself and his wife Sarah as they expand their family. Returning series to HGTV include Sarah’s House, Home to Flip and Marriage Under Construction.

Slice will debut Love Incorporated (produced by Summerhill Entertainment, 13 x 30 minutes), the story of two real-life ‘dating experts,’ Annabelle and Justin, that also happen to be newlyweds. The series follows the couple as they negotiate balancing the operation of their matchmaking business, FastLife, with their own domestic hopes and dreams. Returning series for Slice include At the End of My Leash and Party Mamas.

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

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