People/Biz

CNBC, LinkedIn release results of latest gender gap survey

Global business news organization CNBC and professional network LinkedIn have revealed the findings from their latest “Closing the Gap” survey, looking at gender disparities in the entertainment industry. Together, the two companies ...
October 29, 2018

Global business news organization CNBC and professional network LinkedIn have revealed the findings from their latest “Closing the Gap” survey, looking at gender disparities in the entertainment industry.

Together, the two companies polled 1,010 LinkedIn users who work in the entertainment industry in the U.S. to examine their perceptions of gender disparities in the industry.

Overall, the survey found disparities favoring men in the workplace, with more women reporting inequality than men in response to most questions.

Key findings include:

  • Inequality in pay, with 26% of women and 52% of men agreeing with the statement “At my company men and women working at the same level are paid the same.”
  • Inequality in promotions, with 36% of women and 57% of men believing that men and women are promoted at an equal rate.
  • Visible gender discrimination, with 35% of women having witnessed gender discrimination in the workplace, compared to 23% of men. 76% of women believe that women feel uncomfortable reporting harassment, compared to 63% of men.
  • Additional obstacles for women, with 79% of women suggesting there are obstacles in the workplace that make it challenging for women, compared to 56% of men.
  • Leadership disparities, with 33% of women agreeing that men and women are equally likely to become leaders in their industry, compared to 49% of men.

Roughly half of all respondents (50% of women, 49% of men) suggested that the biggest challenges women face in the workplace is an unsupportive or biased corporate culture, while 14% of all respondents believe the biggest challenge is a lack of female leadership.

The survey also asked respondents what they believe the solutions to workplace gender disparities might be. Reported solutions were similarly divided by gender:

  • 68% of women and 48% of men believe studios and productions need to give female directors and writers more opportunities.
  • 30% of women and 18% of men believe the number of female movie critics needs to increase.
  • 25% of women and 24% of men believe encouraging executives to be more outspoken on the importance of diversity and inclusion in the workplace is the most important step in fostering a more equal workplace.
  • 22% of women and 16% of men believe creating more opportunities for mentorship and/or sponsorship is the best way to foster a more inclusive workplace.
  • 21% of all respondents believe the most important step is to encourage both recruiters and casting directors to consider talent from diverse backgrounds and perspectives.

While the survey results highlight a perception of disparity, a majority of respondents feel that the industry is moving in a more equal direction, with 71% of all respondents agreeing that the industry will shift towards more equal representation in the next decade. Younger respondents of both sexes were the most optimistic, with 78% of young women and 74% of young men expecting change.

69% of men and 62% of women reported believing that the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements will have lasting effects on the industry.

About The Author

Menu

Search