People/Biz

Content exec Janice Min exits Quibi

Quibi content executive Janice Min is reportedly stepping down from her post at Jeffrey Katzenberg’s short-form streamer just under a year after joining the startup. Min’s exit, first reported by CNN’s Brian ...
September 5, 2019

Quibi content executive Janice Min is reportedly stepping down from her post at Jeffrey Katzenberg’s short-form streamer just under a year after joining the startup.

Min’s exit, first reported by CNN’s Brian Stelter on Twitter, marks the second high level executive departure in recent months. Former head of partnerships and advertising Tim Connolly left the startup in August as part of a reported reorganization.

Min, who was tasked with overseeing news and information content for the company, previously worked as a consultant at NBCUniversal. Most notably, the industry veteran served as the editorial director at The Hollywood Reporter from June 2010 and December 2013 before moving up the ranks to co-president and chief creative officer of The Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Group.

The millennial-focused streamer, set to launch in April 2020, is led by Katzenberg and CEO Meg Whitman.

WndrCo, the media and technology company founded by Katzenberg, secured US$1 billion in funding in 2018. Media industry heavyweights including Disney, Lionsgate, MGM, NBCUniversal, Sony, Viacom, Warner Media, eOne and ITV are just a few to back Quibi, which promises to serve up quick bites of entertainment for a mobile-first demographic.

Quibi spokespersons have confirmed Min’s exit to various media outlets but have not provided details as to the reasons behind the move.

While the platform has been lining up A-list content creators and directors such as Steven Spielberg and Guillermo del Toro for projects, and unscripted fare is also set to feature in its schedule, the service is also generating buzz in the production community with an innovative rights model, outlined by Katzenberg at the Banff World Media Festival in June.

There, Katzenberg detailed how certain Quibi projects will exist in two versions – one that is edited into the bite-sized episodes that will drive the service and one that is long-form fare. For the shorter episodes, rights revert back to the creator after a seven-year window of exclusivity, and for the long-form versions, the IP ownership reverts back to the creators after two years, who can then shop the project to other international buyers.

“These things have a giant upside,” Katzenberg told the Banff audience. “It’s the first time in my 40 years in the business in which we are making it possible for all creators and producers, and even the studios, to own their own IP.”

(With files from Barry Walsh and playback’s Jordan Pinto)

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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