Docs

“Landlock”, “GenX: A Chemical Cocktail” receive Rogovy Foundation funding

Director Alex Pritz’s Landlock and Elijah Yetter-Bowman’s GenX: A Chemical Cocktail are among the six recipients of The Rogovy Foundation’s Winter 2019 Miller/Packan Documentary Film Fund Award. The Rogovy Foundation invests ...
February 4, 2020

Director Alex Pritz’s Landlock and Elijah Yetter-Bowman’s GenX: A Chemical Cocktail are among the six recipients of The Rogovy Foundation’s Winter 2019 Miller/Packan Documentary Film Fund Award.

The Rogovy Foundation invests in inspired people and non-profit organizations working to build “a more enlightened and harmonious planet.” The foundation’s Miller/Packan Documentary Film Fund Award was created in honor of educators Sally Miller and Mae Packan. It aims to support documentaries that perpetuate the idealism and critical thinking the pair brought to their students.

“Climate, environmental issues, and investigative journalism are themes from this round of awards,” said foundation founder Hugh Rogovy in a statement. “We’re pleased to support raising awareness of these important topics.”

The Miller/Packan Documentary Film Fund awards grants totaling US$200,000 annually through its summer and winter open calls.

Pritz’s vérité feature film Landlock (pictured) documents a group of populist Brazilian farmers as they vie for control of the Amazon rainforest and the conflict that erupts at the forest’s edge. The film is executive produced by Danfung Dennis.

Yetter-Bowman’s GenX: A Chemical Cocktail, meanwhile, will confront a 70-year-old cover-up of man-made chemicals having found their way into the public’s drinking water. Sammy Bauer serves as assistant director and executive producer. Gill Holland is executive producer.

Additional films granted funding from The Rogovy Foundation are Casey Carter’s To Use a Mountain, which presents vignettes of ruin and salvation in six candidate communities for America’s nuclear dumping grounds (producer: Colleen Cassingham); Jerry Risius’s Storm Lake Untitled, in which Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Art Cullen and his family fight to be the journalistic voice of their rural Iowan farming community (producer/co-director: Beth Levison); Ben Stillerman’s Untitled Utah Climate Change Denial Documentary, which takes an unfiltered look at the 10,000 residents of Emery County, Utah, which has less belief in climate change (27%) than anywhere else in the U.S. (producer: Jesse Ryan); and Ramin Bahrani’s Untitled Rural Healthcare Documentary, which explores the deteriorating healthcare options in America’s rural South and the potential crisis for these communities (producers: Pamela Ryan, Jason Orans, Summer Shelton).

Applications are now being accepted for the summer 2020 open call, ending May 15. Click here for further information.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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