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Cineflix teams with dream hampton for “Black Wall Street” docuseries

Toronto-headquartered Cineflix Productions has partnered with Surviving R. Kelly executive producer dream hampton on the limited docuseries Black Wall Street (working title). Approaching the centennial anniversary of the event, the tentatively titled limited series will ...
June 1, 2020

Toronto-headquartered Cineflix Productions has partnered with Surviving R. Kelly executive producer dream hampton on the limited docuseries Black Wall Street (working title).

Approaching the centennial anniversary of the event, the tentatively titled limited series will recount the Tulsa race massacre, in which white residents slaughtered as many as 300 African American residents, and injured more than 800, between May 31 and June 1,

The attacks – carried out on the ground and from private airplanes – destroyed more than 35-square blocks of the once-thriving Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which was at the time the wealthiest black community in the U.S.

The tragedy serves as one of the “most devastating massacres” in the history of racial violence in American history, though the story remains largely forgotten.

As a result, Tulsa’s current mayor, G.T. Bynum, has launched an investigation to locate the unknown sites of mass graves and provide closure to the community despite opposition from some Oklahomans.

Hampton will serve as executive producer and director on Black Wall Street.

Her recent production credits include Lifetime’s Emmy-nominated Surviving R. Kelly; Frameline feature-length documentary Treasure; HBO feature documentary It’s A Hard Truth Ain’t It; and BET docuseries Finding Justice.

“After 99 years of silence, Black Wall Street needs to be told, and there’s no one better than dream hampton to bring it to life. Driven by social justice, her sensitive yet hard-hitting approach will honor the fallen and help heal a wound by shining a light on a story that’s been brushed under the rug for far too long,” said J.C. Mills, president and commercial director at Cineflix Productions, in a statement. “If the recent tragic stories of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery have shown us anything, it’s that there’s still much work to be done.”

“Black people from Tulsa have refused to let the Greenwood District Massacre be erased from history. I’m so inspired by their persistence to lift up the stories of what North Tulsa was before the massacre. They are proud that their ancestors, just a generation out of slavery, purchased land and created businesses that personified Black excellence,” added hampton. “As the centennial approaches they are still searching for a mass grave they believe contains the bodies of the victims of the Black Wall Street Massacre, and they are still demanding reparations. I’m inspired to learn this history from them, and to tell their ongoing story.”

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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