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“American Factory”, “Queer Eye” win at 2020 Creative Arts Emmys

Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert’s Oscar-winning documentary American Factory, A&E’s Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath and Netflix’s Queer Eye secured wins at the first night of the Television Academy’s Creative Arts Emmy ...
September 15, 2020

Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert’s Oscar-winning documentary American Factory, A&E’s Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath and Netflix’s Queer Eye secured wins at the first night of the Television Academy’s Creative Arts Emmy Awards, held Monday (Sept. 14).

Hosted by Nicole Byer (Nailed It!), the first of this year’s five ceremonies recognized artists and craftspeople in the categories of reality and non-fiction.

Bognar and Reichert’s American Factory (pictured; Netflix) won Outstanding Directing for a Documentary/Non-Fiction Program.

The film, set in post-industrial Ohio, chronicles the culture clash that ensures after a Chinese billionaire opens a new factory in the husk of an abandoned General Motors plant.

Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath, meanwhile, took the top prize for Outstanding Hosted Nonfiction Series or Special.

The docuseries, hosted and executive produced by Remini, investigates the controversial Church of Scientology. Eli Holzman, Aaron Saidman, Ray Dotch and Devon Graham Hammonds serve as executive producers; Mike Rinder and Chris Rowe are co-executive producers.

Queer Eye, which recently capped off its fifths season on Netflix, took home the top prize for Outstanding Structured Reality program.

The series is executive produced by David Collins, Michael Williams, Rob Eric, Jennifer Lane, Jordana Hochman, Adam Sher, David George and David Eilenberg. Rachelle Mendez and Mark Bracero are co-executive producers.

HBO documentary The Apollo, directed by Roger Ross Williams, won in the category of Outstanding Documentary or Non-Fiction Special.

The film, which looks at the storied history of New York’s iconic Apollo Theater, is produced by Lisa Cortés, Jeanne Elfant Festa, Cassidy Hartmann and Williams.

Dan Cogan, Nicholas Ferrall and Julie Goldman executive produce.

Greg Whitley, who served as director on the “Daytona” episode of Netflix docuseries Cheer, won Outstanding Directing for a Reality program.

Finally, National Geographic’s Creating Cosmos: Possible Worlds won in the category of Oustanding Short-Form Non-Fiction or Reality Series.

The Neil deGrasse Tyson-hosted sequel to Nat Geo’s Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey is executive produced by Erin Newsome and Sarah Lavoie.

Maricruz Merlo is supervising producer; Meghan Gleason, Matt Wizan and Tatiana Villegas produce.

The reimagined Creative Arts Emmy Awards streams nightly through to Thursday (Sept. 17) at 8 p.m. ET/PT, with a fifth broadcast ceremony on Saturday (Sept. 19) at 8 p.m. ET/PT on FXX, an FX Networks channel.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Television Academy announced in June plans to move the Creative Arts Emmys online. For the first time in the history of the awards, the organization will be forgoing its annual Governors Ball, traditionally held after the Emmys and Creative Arts Emmys.

Hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, the 72nd primetime Emmy Awards — set to broadcast Sept. 20 on ABC at 8 p.m. ET/PT — will also be presented remotely.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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