Docs

DOK Leipzig, Ji.hlava festivals unveil award winners

Dieudo Hamadi’s Downstream to Kinshasa and Mercedes Halfon and Laura Citarella’s The Poets Visit Juana Bignozzi were among the films to be honored at the 63rd annual DOK Leipzig festival. Downstream to Kinshasa (pictured) picked ...
November 2, 2020

Dieudo Hamadi’s Downstream to Kinshasa and Mercedes Halfon and Laura Citarella’s The Poets Visit Juana Bignozzi were among the films to be honored at the 63rd annual DOK Leipzig festival.

Downstream to Kinshasa (pictured) picked up DOK Leipzig’s coveted Golden Dove International Competition long documentary and animated film award and a €10,000 prize during a hybrid ceremony held over the weekend.

The 90-minute film follows a group of victims of the Six-Day War in the Democratic Republic of Congo that saw Rwandan and Ugandan forces clashing in a conflict that was part of the bloody Second Congo War.

The award-winning film automatically qualifies for consideration for the Oscars in the documentary feature category.

Downstream to Kinshasa also received the Prize of the Interreligious Jury at DOK Leipzig.

The Poets Visit Juana Bignozzi, meanwhile, took home the Silver Dove for best long documentary or animated film by an up-and-coming director in the long film international competition.

The 90-minute feature tells the story of poet Juana Bignozzi, who returned to her home in Argentina after more than 30 years in exile in Barcelona. Following her death, a young poet seeks to pass on Bignozzi’s artistic legacy.

Feted with the Golden Dove in the long film German competition was Lift Like a Girl from director Mayye Zayed, while the Golden Dove audience award was presented to A New Shift from Czech filmmaker Jindřich Andrš.

For a full list of DOK Leipzig winners, click here.

Elsewhere, the 24th edition of the Czech Ji.hlava International Documentary Film Festival also unveiled its 2020 award winners across five categories.

Slovakian director Viera Čákanyová’s White on White was awarded with the best world documentary in the main competition section, Opus Bonum. The 74-minute film serves as the filmmaker’s video diary that she kept while staying at the Polish Antarctic station.

Special mention was provided to French director Olivier Dury’s A Man Leaning.

The best Czech documentary, meanwhile, was presented to Jindřich Andrš’ A New Shift. The 91-minute film charts the story of a miner who decides to become a computer programmer following the closure of his mine.

Special mention was provided to Martin Páv’s Wolves at the Borders.

Finally, the Between the Seas award – which is awarded to the best Central and East European documentary film – went to Latvian director Ivars Zviedris for Latvian Coyote. The 90-minute feature shares the intimate story of a smuggler struggling to survive in his small village near the Latvia-Russia border.

All winners can be found by accessing the Ji.hlava IDFF website.

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