Docs

Nat Geo People acquires “4 Babies a Second”

The broadcaster has acquired global rights, excluding North America and France, for the 10 x 60-minute doc series, which filmed births in maternity wards in France, India, California and Senegal.
November 14, 2014

Nat Geo People has bought global broadcast rights, excluding France and North America, for observational documentary series 4 Babies a Second.

Coproduced by Paris-based indie Pernel Media and French FIC channel Voyage, and distributed by Zodiak Rights, 4 Babies a Second follows the premise that four babies are born every second across the four continents.

The 10 x 60-minute documentary series captures how economics, legislation, religion and culture contribute to the birth experience, telling those tales through the eyes of staff in four maternity wards in France, India, California and Senegal.

4 Babies a Second is a milestone for Pernel Media,” said the company’s president, and series exec producer Samuel Kissous, in a statement. “It demonstrates our ability to produce an ambitious international factual series to the highest quality standards.”

The Nat Geo People sale marks Pernel Media’s biggest original international program sale to date. The series was acquired for an undisclosed amount by Nat Geo People’s senior VP of programming and strategic development Jules Oldroyd.

Air dates for Turkey, Germany, Italy, Denmark and Southeast Asia have yet to be confirmed, however Nat Geo People Australia is slated to be the first territory to broadcast the series on Sunday, November 23.

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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