Docs

MSNBC goes green with “Just Eat It”

U.S. network MSNBC is celebrating Earth Day with the U.S. television premiere of the Canadian doc Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story (pictured).
April 7, 2015

U.S. network MSNBC is celebrating Earth Day with the American television premiere of the Canadian documentary Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.

Airing on April 22 at 10 p.m. EST, Just Eat It will be paired with a discussion on food waste, moderated by MSNBC food correspondent, chef and Top Chef judge, Tom Colicchio.

Panelists for the on-air discussion will include Jonathan Bloom, the author of American Wasteland – How America Throws Away Nearly Half of Its Food; Emily Broad Leib, director of the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic; and Mike Curtin, the CEO of non-profit DC Central Kitchen.

The doc, produced by Peg Leg Films in partnership with British Columbia’s Knowledge Network, explores the impact of food waste on the economy, climate and health by following filmmakers Grant Baldwin and Jenny Rustemeyer as they give up grocery shopping for six months.

In the film, the couple only consume food that would have been thrown out, including perfectly edible food discarded because of packaging errors, and produce that did not meet the strict guidelines set by state laws and retailers.

Diana Holtzberg negotiated the deal on behalf of Films Transit International, Inc.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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