Docs

“Bloodthicker,” “Border South” get Tribeca All Access grants

The Tribeca Film Institute (TFI) has announced the selection of ten projects for the 14th annual Tribeca All Access (TAA) program. Now in its 14th year, the TAA program—which serves as TFI’s ...
February 22, 2017

The Tribeca Film Institute (TFI) has announced the selection of ten projects for the 14th annual Tribeca All Access (TAA) program.

Now in its 14th year, the TAA program—which serves as TFI’s flagship scripted and documentary filmmaker program—supports filmmakers from underrepresented communities, granting chosen projects with financial support as well as year-round guidance and resources to complete their projects. Grantees of the fund are also eligible for the TAA Alumni program, which supports their present and future work.

Hailing from 45 cities, this year’s group of applicants was the most geographically diverse in the program’s history, according to a statement made by TFI.

Since 2004, TAA has supported 278 films and more than 540 filmmakers. Projects have included Whose Streets?Nas: Time is Illmatic, Obvious Child and Gideon’s Army.

The five grants that will be awarded to documentary projects in various stages include:

  • Bloodthicker — In the shadows of their famous fathers, three young men fight to build upon their familial legacies while navigating the pitfalls of rap culture.
  • Border South — Mexico now deports more immigrants than the United States. Border South melds ethnography and cinema-verité to explore the harsh environment and brutal journey of undocumented immigrants from Central America crossing through Mexico towards the United States.
  • How to Have an American Baby — There is a city in Southern California that is teeming with pregnant women from China. How to Have an American Baby is a kaleidoscopic voyage, told through multiple perspectives, into the booming shadow economy catering to Chinese birth tourists who travel to the U.S. on “birthing vacations” in order to give birth to babies who will become American citizens.
  • Jaddoland — A visit back home to Texas prompts the filmmaker to reflect on her mother’s creative life. However, when her Iraqi refugee grandfather arrives on their doorstep, his presence raises deeper questions about belonging and the places the family calls home.
  • The Youth — A father seeks to understand why his son is accused of terrorism after an FBI sting operation puts him and five others in prison. The Youth follows the lives of Somali-Americans in Minnesota as they struggle against Islamophobia in contemporary America.

Five grants were also awarded to scripted projects in various stages. You can see the full list here.

About The Author
Andrew Tracy joined Realscreen as associate editor in 2021, following 17 years as managing editor of the award-winning international film magazine Cinema Scope. From 2010 to 2020 he also held the position of senior editor at the Toronto International Film Festival, where he oversaw the flagship publication for the organization’s year-round Cinematheque programming and edited its first original monograph in a decade, Steve Gravestock’s A History of Icelandic Film. He was a scriptwriter and consultant on the first season of the Vice TV series The Vice Guide to Film, and his writing and reporting have been featured in such outlets as Cinema Scope, Reverse Shot, Sight & Sound, Cineaste, Film Comment, MUBI Notebook, POV, and Montage.

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